It’s in the Blood

It's in the Blood

When I was a kid, I used to have the most horrendous nightmares.  I would wake up in the night, paralyzed with fear.  Even now I recall wandering the nightmare version of the street we lived on, knowing that once again I was to be stalked and torn apart.  Every night I would go to bed. I would enter the murky, disordered world of dreams.  I would be chased.  I would hide. It always ended badly, an arm or leg painfully torn from its socket.  I’d wake up gasping for air.

Once and a while, a movie comes along that has that same nightmarish feel.  It’s in the Blood is one of those movies.

The appropriately named October (Sean Elliot) returns home to patch things up with his estranged father (Lance Henriksen), the local peace officer in what, judging by his police cruiser) is probably the poorest county in the USA.  The two go for a trip into the woods and weird things happen.

It’s in the Blood was made on a very small budget, most of it likely going to pay for the sack lunches that Mr. Henricksen accepts in lieu of cash.   The film’s producers managed to make the most of their resources.  The effects are surprising good, so go in fact that it was sometimes a little distracting. I was especially surprised by the quality of the CGI effects.  I’ve seen many bigger budget films that looked far worse.

You’ll note that I made a point of talking about the film’s look and feel without getting to far into the story or scares.  It’s in the Blood shares more with Italian horror than American horror, in my opinion.  The film dwells on texture and atmosphere rather than the storyline. Timelines skip back and forth in a disordered, nightmarish way.  Odd, frightening things lurk just out of sight – you know, like that time you were staggering around Walmart while suffering from fever hallucinations while looking for the death green cold remedy.  Remember that? I barely do.

The bottom line is that It’s in the Blood is surprise treat for fans of genre favorite Lance Henriksen and should garner a following from fans of atmospheric, moody Italian-style horror.

Staring:
Lance Henriksen
Sean Elliot
Rose Sirna
Jimmy Gonzales

Director:
Scooter Downey

Screenplay:
Scooter Downey
Sean Elliot
Two and a half of five Vincents

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